Development

One of the issues I had with Drupal when I first started working on it was how to handle the one-off pages or sections of a site that didn’t fit into something like a Node. Nodes work for repeated pieces of content that will share the same structure, but as soon as we have complicated, one-off pages or sections, we start to need something more.

While working as a junior web developer, I spent most of my time with WordPress developing several WordPress websites for my clients. I enjoyed developing custom themes and addressing my client's requirements with all the cool plugins available for WordPress. Now that I have been working for a shop that focuses on Drupal, I have had to wrap my head around the differences between the two platforms. There are substantial conceptual differences between the two CMSs and I would like to share my experience working with Drupal.

Over 8 months after release and my first D8 site under my belt I can now say I am excited for the future of working with Drupal’s freshest release. That being said at this stage in the game the decision to go with D8 should approached with caution. It does what it does well but many of those shiny contrib modules you’re used to using just aren’t there yet. Unless your team and client are willing to spend the time and money needed to develop or port the missing functionality it might not be a fit for that particular project.

Grunt and Bower are great command line tools for automating tedious front-end workflow tasks, and quickly adding libraries to a project. With Grunt we can define a series of tasks such as concatenating files, compressing images, running scripts, and so on. Bower is self-described as a “package manager for the web”. It provides an easy way to install a wide variety of libraries into a project, from twitter bootstrap, jQuery, font-awesome, and even your own personal repositories.

Check Your PHP Version

Andre — December 17th ’13

Making sure your Drupal is up to date is a good start but often people forget about keeping PHP up to date. PHP 5.3 has reached end of life and will no longer have any more security updates in July 2014. It is important to make sure your site is running on a supported version. Please note, it is also important to make sure all your server's other software are up to date (i.e.

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